Would an extractor work to change the fluid in my automatic transmission

TerryMason

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Staff member
I'd like to change the fluid (or at least most of the fluid) in my 2005 Jeep TJ (42RLE) again. Normally I'd pull the aftermarket skidplate, and drop the pan, then fill things back up again. I'm wondering if an oil pump like this might make things easier:


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( I like that it has an "American Interface" ;) )

I've heard this is what most shops do when they don't do a flush, but I don't know if that's true.
What do you guys think, would this make a partial fluid change as easy as it seems?
 

If you are just swapping3-4 quarts os oil then thisworks. If you are interested in checking for metal flakes and wear …. Drop the pan. Change filter=change the pan. Swap all fluid. Pull the lines tothe cooler and empty and draw from there.

There is a process for this but you need a tires off the ground lift.


Never look down on anyone unless you are helping them up - Jesse Jackson
 
I changed the filter a couple of years ago. I really should look up when I did that.
I've heard of disconnecting the cooler lines and using them to supply / remove. That sounds pretty cool, and I may try that.
 

The local Ford service department uses them for transmission drain and fill service.

I've used one for oil changes and qas surprised to find that the suction system effectively evacuated the crankcase and pan. I might go to just a traditional pull the plug drain and fill every third chanhe.
 
Got something in the mail today! It's been way too cold to try it out but maybe this weekend.


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Warm the engine first, and it helps to be ready to move the tube up and down until you get it into the deepest recess.

With these units, it makes it easier to change fluids more often.
 
Warm the engine first, and it helps to be ready to move the tube up and down until you get it into the deepest recess.

With these units, it makes it easier to change fluids more often.

What you talking about Willis??!

This sounds like an impractical, jokers’ skit. OK, Go outside, lift the hood and lean over the engine. Now say very loudly and slowly and using a deep voice.


Never look down on anyone unless you are helping them up - Jesse Jackson
 
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What's the go-to ATF for my transmission? I believe that I put Castrol ATF+4 last time around. I won't be changing it all, so whatever I put in will need to be compatible with what is already in there.

I see they have some Valvoline synthetic ATF+4 at the local Advance Auto:

Is synthetic ATF better than standard for my 175k mile 42RLE?
 
I just wrapped up the fluid change, using Valvoline synthetic ATF+4. I love this fluid extractor. It made things super easy.
To answer my own previous question, the internet says that non-synthetic and synthetic ATF can mix together fine. The important thing for my trans is that it's ATF+4


I wish I had bought one a long time ago. Now that it's this easy, I could see doing a partial ATF change with every other oil change.

How bad does this fluid look to you guys? It doesn't smell like anything (no burnt smell)
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Dot some on a white napkin,
Paper. Not the silk ones you used last time.

Looks dark but it could be the lighting or something.


Never look down on anyone unless you are helping them up - Jesse Jackson
 

TP works
Fresh TP

Thats kinda brown.
Some red showing.

Run it a week and do another swap. Each dump and fill changes ~30% dump and fill app 6 times and you will have 80%-90% new fluid.



Never look down on anyone unless you are helping them up - Jesse Jackson
 
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What you talking about Willis??!

This sounds like an impractical, jokers’ skit. OK, Go outside, lift the hood and lean over the engine. Now say very loudly and slowly and using a deep voice.


Never look down on anyone unless you are helping them up - Jesse Jackson

Using an extractor. It helps to have a warm engine and transmission. Slip the suction hose down the transmission fill tube. Move the tube up and down until it reaches the deepest point. Actuate suction and extract trans fluid. Easy peasy for anyone that has ever done even simple maintenance on a vehicle like a Jeep.
 

What's the go-to ATF for my transmission? I believe that I put Castrol ATF+4 last time around. I won't be changing it all, so whatever I put in will need to be compatible with what is already in there.

I see they have some Valvoline synthetic ATF+4 at the local Advance Auto:

Is synthetic ATF better than standard for my 175k mile 42RLE?
I don't have any scientific data on this, but only personal observations. It's best to stay with the same trans fluid type (regular vs synthetic), and ideally the same brand. But don't sweat it if there is some mixing in a pinch. Make sure to always use a trans fluid that meets the vehicle specifications. And change the trans fluid based on the Severe Use schedule or sooner even if your rig is a daily driver.

IMHO, keeping the fluid fresh is key, and that is why the extraction pumps are so helpful...they make the fluid swap easy (for most folks). Too often I see vehicles with stripped transmission pan bolts or leaky trans pan gasgets resulting from work at shops or by individuals...which coukd have been avoided with suction extraction.
 
Too often I see vehicles with stripped transmission pan bolts or leaky trans pan gasgets resulting from work at shops or by individuals...which coukd have been avoided with suction extraction.

The first, and only time I previously changed the fluid, I dropped the pan and changed the filter. One of the nutserts was loose in the frame, so I couldn't unbolt the transmission skid fully. I was close to quitting before I thought to get all the other bolts out, leaving the last one in place, and swing / rotate the skid out of the way in order to drop the pan.

These days I have replaced the stock skids with some really nice Undercover Fab engine and transmission skid plates. I love them, but they are a pain to take on an off. They become a disincentive to changing the transmission fluid.
 
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